How You Can Help The Battle To Protect Our Ash Trees

From the District Council website:

Chalara dieback of ash

Posted on 08 November 2012 by admin

What is the threat to the ash population in the District and in the UK?

Cherry Orchard Country ParkChalara dieback of ash is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea. The disease causes leaf loss in affected trees, and can lead to tree death.

The Forestry Commission state that it is potentially a very serious threat. Experience of the outbreak in Europe indicates that it kills young ash trees very quickly, while older trees tend to resist it for some time until prolonged exposure causes them to succumb as well.

There is no evidence of any risk to humans or animals from Chalara fraxinea.

Reporting suspected cases

The Council are carrying out inspections of trees that may be affected, particularly young trees in Cherry Orchard Jubilee Country Park, however, if you notice the disease on any trees on Council land or on any tree with a Tree Preservation Order please contact the Customer Services on 01702 318111.

Otherwise please click on the below link to the Forestry Commission website which has a video on how to recognise the disease and a contact number 08459 33 55 77 (open 8am – 6pm every day) to ring to report cases:

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/chalara

Further information

How you can stop the spread of Chalara fraxinea :

We do ask that if you are visiting an area of trees, please take some simple precautions:

  • do not remove any plant material (firewood, sticks, leaves or cuttings)
  • where possible, before leaving the area , clean soil, mud, leaves and other plant material from footwear, clothing, dogs, horses, the wheels and tyres of bicycles, baby buggies, carriages and other vehicles, and remove any leaves which are sticking to your car
  • before visiting other countryside sites, parks, garden centres and nurseries, thoroughly wash footwear, wheels and tyres in soapy water

 

There are ash trees in Hockley Woods, but thankfully there are plenty of other trees as well. There are also some ash in Kingley Wood.

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